Archive for the ‘Design Tools’ Category

Six Circles – An experience design framework

Monday, January 30th, 2012

cover

This ebook has taken far too long to write but at last it is finally finished. The beauty of self-publishing is also the major problem with it – nobody pushes you, you aren’t paid and for all you know nobody will read it once it’s published. I wanted to see how the many different aspects of the book may develop conversations within the user experience community.

Elements of the book have already aged, but the principles continue, even though the examples may not! However, I hope you enjoy the read and I am really interested to know your thoughts, either here or on twitter. Currently it is only an ePub available for mobile devices but if the demand is there, other versions will be made available.

Download Six Circles for Epub readers
(See the comments section below for browser-based ePub readers)

Download Six Circles as a PDF

Some accompanying thoughts

In the last year I have seen how the different elements of the Six Circles transcend user experience, into the fields of brand strategy, service design and customer experience. It is my view that in ten years time we will be talking about what we do today in very different terms due to the contexts that we have to design for, using technology that is only beginning to become pervasive in our physical environment. I predict that UX and Service Design will cease to be differentiated, as they will be so entwined it would be too difficult, and potentially inefficient to separate into different disciplines.

I have seen enough of touch and tablet usage, mobile devices, ‘Everyware’ (and even Microsoft’s shift of it’s Windows 8 platform towards the touch paradigm) to feel that we are in for an exciting decade ahead.

Call it the legacy of Steve Jobs, but what he has left us with is a global population who are more instantly engaged with technology than we could have imagined ten years ago. To allow the very young and very old to interact with content through the same device is a stunning achievement, and for the interface and interaction designers to be able to support a richer experience is truly exciting.

Unfortunately companies are still catching up, fearful of failure and what they perceive as risk. Watching their competitors to see who makes the first move but the time for businesses to be brave and bold is now. There is not much time remaining for some businesses to make use of the power of meaningful, rich experiences delivered by brands that satisfy the culture and contextual uses of the users. Those companies that achieve this will simply dominate at a rate that is faster due to the networked society.

But all the talk of technology misses the point. It is the human needs, desires and emotions and their interactions with each other that create our insights that in turn drive innovation and success for companies. These experiences make the difference. It is the quality of experience that is the differentiator for any company in a crowded market.

Solving people problems will inevitably solve business problems. The challenge is to get businesses to believe in it, and trust those to deliver on the promise of user centred design. But with a process that is understood and a philosophy that appeals to many, there is alot we can do to ensure the business world adopts a path to greater product development, that builds on the needs and wants of people at its core.

Getting UX Integrated

Monday, June 21st, 2010

The purpose of UXBASIS is not only to be a set of methods for UX practitioners but it is also a way of introducing UX to the wider organisation. The talk I gave last month to a group of Danish web product managers was focused on not only the tools we use in UX but how they themselves can successfully integrate UX into their organisation.

The audience represented those who really are empowered to change the user experience daily – the product and web development managers. In the presentation I highlight several ways to create change and use approaches to help give a different perspective to their task in hand.

So much of what they deal with, the political and organisational challenges as well as resource issues and technological constraints, we only observe as UX people. The real-life of producing and implementing what we draft is something that as UX people we need to be more mindful of. After the implementation of the ideas, these people are the ones who must ensure business runs as usual and goals are met.

The presentation is an introduction and also a practical approach to get UX integrated with 5 tips to help UX become a reality in the team and the business.

UXBASIS goes mobile

Thursday, May 6th, 2010

 

photo   We have released UXBASIS as a mobile version, so your smart phone can now easily navigate the cards within a browser.
Entering www.uxbasis.com into your address bar will automatically direct you to the mobile version.

Within the next week we are also accepting orders on the UXBASIS cards and poster, and we aim to deliver worldwide for a fee that just covers the cost of production and shipping.

We have kept costs low to ensure that the items can be distributed beyond UX teams and into the wider development community. This is where we feel that the real impact of these tools will be felt, benefitting users and businesses alike.

We decided to make physical cards to help people like us communicate with project managers and clients about the work that we do and the purposes of our tasks.

If anything we hope that UXBASIS is a conversation starter with the people who have influence over product teams, and inevitably control budgets.

Our aim is to help businesses and professionals work smarter and more collaboratively by making these tools more readily available to those in the user experience field.

If you are interested in purchasing a box of cards or a poster (or both) then email uxinfo@hellogroup.com or follow @hellogroup on Twitter to keep updated.

Embed BASIS

Wednesday, September 30th, 2009

Embed the tools in your blog and always have a reference on hand…

What, when and why of wireframes – Hello Ignite

Thursday, September 24th, 2009

This five minute talk on wireframes is a condensed version of the blog post – the ‘What, when and why of wireframes‘. Hello Group have taken inspiration from the O’Reilly talks which, in turn have taken the idea from a couple of architects based in Tokyo – the Pecha Kucha way of presentation. In short, you have five minutes to tell the story and its an efficient (but pressurised!) method to get a message across. You can see the presentation here with accompanying audio.

Its a great way to do presentations but listen out for the comment right at the end – he was right!

UX BASIS

Thursday, September 24th, 2009
diagram A lot of what I do never sees the light of day. That is something that took me a while to be comfortable with. Especially when you work in design, many times you are judged on what you produce.

Much of my work exists in strategic reports that may never get funding from sponsors. Ideas that just exist on the page or research that may be implemented when the hardware is there to support it. Wrapped up in non-disclosure agreements, it is a fact of working in this industry. One that you need to deal with if you are going to enjoy the processes of making a good user experience.

(more…)

The Next Web startups

Saturday, April 25th, 2009

 

 

judges   

Aside from speakers, The Next Web also showcased 19 startups  from an initial list of 200 (though only 18 showed up due to a patent issue). Sun Microsystems sponsored the competition with the eventual winner being presented with a cheque from Netlog.

(more…)

Engagement and optimisation: Defining behaviours

Tuesday, March 24th, 2009

 

personas


Photo by Nicholas Nova

 

The second of a seven part post about optimising a site to create a more engaged audience. Here we look at user behaviour and how methods used help ensure you address user needs.

Previously: Success metrics

(more…)

Holistic concept models: an ROI blueprint

Sunday, November 30th, 2008

 

process    I read a post recently that illustrated how concept models are rarely used in the right way and are often  misunderstood. Are they really worth doing at all?

 

Now seems a good  time to expand on the tool that Dan Brown has popularised through his book Communicating Design. Not as simply a stand alone tool but one that can provide a blueprint for giving solid ROI on design, analytics and testing.

(more…)